Die Frau Hulle: A Bavarian Legend
 
.
[
HOME][BACK]

 
Grimm's Hausmärchen
Grimm's Fairy Tales
Frau Holle: The Tale of Goldmarie and Pechmarie

Perhaps the best known tale of Frau Holle is the tale told by Jacob Grimm of the
industrious sister and the lazy sister  who encounter Frau Holle after falling down a well.
The industrious girl is rewarded with gold for her kind heart and hard work.
 The lazy girl is covered in soot and returns home empty-handed.
This tale has been made into a film on more than one occassion.


Record Book Read Aloud
1954 Fritz Genschow Film
1985 Frau Holle Ganzer Film (Part I)

Numerous tales of Frau Holle exist. Jakob Grimm chronicled a cross-section of them;
and a modern collection of her tales  as well as a thorough study of her legend
were published in the last century. Still, few of her tales have made it into the  popular imagination. 
Based on the number of times it has been reprinted, the second most popular tale is that of  two brothers.

    Frau Hulle & 'Krumme' Jakob
A Bavarian Legend
 
 A popular Bavarian Legend which appeared in print as early as 1852 speaks of two brothers divided over an inheritance. The cruel older brother takes everything for himself after their father's death, leaving the younger brother, Krumme Jakob, or 'Crippled Jacob' with nothing. Destitute and alone, Jakob is befriended by Frau Hulle, an old spinster, who demands his obedience. He does as he's told and is rewarded richly for his fidelity. In time, his older brother is brought to ruin.
      Frau Holle's character as the Earth Mother, and as Odin's Wife is evident throughout the tale. She reminds us of Frigg in the prose introduction to Grímnismal, and the older History of the Lombards. As the Earth mother, she teaches Jakob to farm, tends his crops and bales his hay, and wields control over the elements to help or hurt those who please or displease her.
       Below I have gathered two English translations, as well as two German translations of the poem from various sites on the internet for comparison. 
Frau Hülle
Author Unknown
Frau Hulle
Translation by Catherine Heath
From the book 'Es Spukt in Franken' by Michael Proettel

On the Schellenberg between Heimbuchenthal and Wintersbach there was a castle, and in its courtyard stood a mighty linden tree. It was as old as the castle, and said that as long as it stands and remains green, the castle will also remain standing. If it should wither, so will the castle crumble and its residents come to naught.

 

Its lordship had two sons. The younger had broken his leg and since then had a limp, thus was named “Crooked Jacob”.

 

Upon his deathbed the father willed his eldest son as heir, the castle as well as a large chest of money on the promise to always keep Jakob with him and be good to him like a brother should.

 

Of course the older brother gave his promise, but once his father died, soon began to treat Jakob badly. Jakob wasn’t allowed to sit at the same table with him, rather had to sleep in the stable with the horses and eat out of a trough.

 

For a while, Jakob put up with this, but then demanded his part of the inheritance so he could leave and try his luck elsewhere. His brother refused, beat him and had him thrown out.

 

Deeply saddened, Jakob left into the thick forest over the mountains until he finally reached the valley by nightfall. There, he sat under a tree, laying his head in his hands to cry bitterly.

 

As he was about to get up again, he saw an old woman sitting on a stone nearby. She was spinning some yarn and nodded to him as she turned the wheel.

 

This was Frau Hülle. She asked him why he was so sad. “You couldn’t possibly help me”, he answered, wanting to leave.

 

"You are Crooked Jakob from the castle", she said, "and I can and will help you, if you will give me your trust”.

 

Thereupon Jakob opened his heart, told Frau Hülle of his plight. Frau Hülle then spoke:

 

 "Come with me, Jakob. In three years we will go to your brother. Perhaps by then he will come to his senses and finally give you your property."

 

She took Jakob with her to her small cottage, there he had to water her rosemary bushes, feed the cats and tend her flax fields.

 

In the winter, he had to cut staves for the wine farmers and barge poles for shippers.

 

In the spring he carried them into the valley to market. Frau Hülle took up her distaff like a cane, packed her yarn together in her shawl, and went with him.

 

When Jakob’s load got too heavy for his leg to bear, she took the wood with her thin arms, carrying it on top of her bundle as if it were straw.

 

Jakob had it good with Frau Hülle. She taught him everything about farming, such that he knew more than any natural born farmer.

 

After three years the old woman said taking her distaff in hand; "Now we shall go to your brother!"- and Jakob accompanied her.

 

When they arrived at the castle, Jakob’s brother sat under the linden, as it was terribly humid. The tree was blossoming, giving a broad cool shade and the birds were singing in its branches.

 

His lordship asked what they wished but before Jakob could respond, Frau Hülle spoke for him- that his brother is there and wants what is rightfully his. His lordship refused, threatening that if they didn’t leave immediately he’d take her feeble old head off and beat Jakob’s good leg to a pulp.

 

This made the old woman so furious, she took her distaff and drove it into the linden tree. Suddenly the birds fled the tree as it began to tremble from the roots to the crown. Out of the trunk and branches sap issued forth, as the leaves turned yellow and fell to the ground.

 

“Oh you villain," she protested, "You shall suffer like this tree. You shall wither and waste and die a miserable death.” Then she left with Jakob.

 

So it came just as Frau Hülle had foretold. As the linden tree died off, the castle began to fall into decay. With each storm a wall or tower collapsed, the floods carrying away the stones, so that none could be built back up again.

 

No one wanted to remain in the castle anymore, and the noble soon finding himself quite alone, withdrew to the cellar to guard his chest of money.

 

Then on a dark November night as there was nothing left of the burg than the cellar and the dead tree, there came a terrible storm. It blew down the tree such that it fell against the cellar doors, trapping him inside.

 

Tried as he might, he could no longer open them, no matter how he threw his weight against them, and so starved to death atop his money chest.

 

Frau Hülle knew all this well, and returned the day after his death, heaving the tree out of the way to enter. She opened the chest and divided its contents into two even portions. One, she left in the chest, gathering up the rest in her shawl. Once she had left, the cellar also collapsed.

 

When she arrived home, she gave Jakob his money and said, “now both of you have your fair share just as your father had wished. Take what is yours but forget about being a nobleman. Become a farmer as in that you will find your better fortune. Farewell Jakob, because you will not see me again!”

 

Thus Jakob thanked her gratefully and used the money to buy a large farmhouse on the Hundsrück near Altenbuch.

 

He chose himself a wife and many farm hands and maids to become a great farmer. No scourge ever befell his animals, no vermin plagued his orchards and no hail fell on his fields.

 

When in harvest the work was more than his people could handle, it would happen that in the morning that they would find the bales already bound and stacked for them to haul away.

 

This amazed the people, but Jakob knew who it was.

 

Then when his first son was born, in his joy he wanted to find Frau Hülle and tell her the news. He headed off alone, but his quest was in vain, as he found neither the cottage nor the valley where it stood- and after a whole day searching aimlessly he found himself back at the farm by the evening.

 

Indeed he never did see the good Frau Hülle again, yet lived to the blessed old age of 90.

 

His farm still exists to this day, and is known as the “Hundrückshof”.

 

 

 

 


 

On the Schellenberg between Heimbuchenthal and Wintersbach there used to stand a stately castle. In the courtyard of this castle there grew a beautiful linden tree. The tree was very tall and the saying went that as long as the linden stood and stayed green, the castle would also bloom. Woe betide though if the linden were to be destroyed for then the castle and its inhabitants would also meet the same fate.
In this castle, there once lived a great lord and his two sons. The eldest son was tall and handsome and the youngest was short and ugly who, in childhood sadly broke his leg and was from then on known as 'Twisted Jakob'.

The lord of the castle was old and sick. Sensing his end was near, he called his sons to his bedside. It was not easy for him to speak, his voice was weak and shook with each word:

'My firstborn, from this day forth, I give you my castle and this wooden coffer filled with gold. Swear to me though that you will always keep our dear Jakob by your side and that you will always be a good brother to him. Make sure all his needs are taken care of!'
With an earnest face, the eldest son gave his word that he would take care of his brother and on that self same day, their father began his eternal sleep.

The old lord was hardly in the ground before the eldest brother broke his word and increasingly came to treat Jakob worse than the day labourers did. No longer would Jakob be allowed to sit at his table to eat nor live in his castle. Instead, the poor Jakob was cast out to sleep in the stall with the horses and eat with the dogs from a bowl.

It didn't take long for Jakob to decide that it would be best to leave his hardhearted brother as soon as he could and so one morning, Jakob went to his brother and said:
'Give me my share of our inheritance, I want to go into the wider world and try my luck elsewhere.'

The new lord of the castle however gave him nothing and just had Jakob thrown out of the castle.
Defeated, Jakob wandered into the surrounding forests and came to rest completely exhausted under a tree, where resting his head on his knees he cried bitterly. When he finally looked up, he caught a glimpse of an old woman on a spinning wheel. Strange. Jakob had heard no sound of her coming. With the nodding of her head, the greyhaired woman peddled the spinning wheel. Jakob had no idea that it was Frau Hulle that was approaching him.
The good hearted old lady wanted to know why Jakob had been crying so bitterly.

'What do you care of my fate. You can't help me.'

Frau Hulle replied:

'You're 'Twisted Jakob' from the Schellenberg castle, aren't you? I know you and your wicked brother. I can help you if you trust me.'
Her words went straight to twisted Jakob's heart as they were the first kind words he'd heard since his father had passed away.
'My brother forced me to eat with the dogs from their feeding bowl! And when I went to ask for my portion of the inheritance, he threw me like a beggar from my father's castle!'

The old lady comforted him:

'Come with me, after exactly three years, we'll go to see your brother again. Perhaps he'll repent in the meantime and give you what's rightfully yours.'

Jakob agreed immediately and Frau Hulle took him with her to her house and Jakob quickly became her indispensable helper. In the summer he cultivated her flax field, cut fence posts in the winter for the vineyard farmers and sail masts for boatmen. Frau Hulle was occupied for the entire time with her spinning wheel.

In the spring, the pair brought their wares to the Main to sell. If Jakob found it became too difficult to carry the fence posts and sail masts because of his lameness, then the good Frau Hulle would take them from him with her scrawny arms and throw them into her shoulder basket as though they were little more than bails of straw. Between Hasloch and Faulbach there was a stone on the way where they would stop to rest each time and in the place where Frau Hulle would lay down her shoulder basket, there are indents in the path from the weight of that load that are still there to see to this day.

Jakob did all he could for Frau Hulle and she taught him everything that there was to know about farming, so that in the end, he understood the land better than one who was born a farmer.

When the three years were up, Frau Hulle told him that they were going to see his brother that day and immediately picked up her distaff, put on her shoulder basket and together they set off for the castle.

When they arrived, they found the wicked brother sitting lazily under the linden tree. Seeing their approach, he asked them what they wanted. Frau Hulle's voice was authorative as she spoke:
'You know exactly what you are guilty of when it comes to your brother. Today we want you to finally give him his rightful inheritance!'

The firstborn brother arrogantly replied:
'If you don't leave and go back to where you came from, I'll rip your wobbly head off and as for 'Twisted Jakob', I'll lame his other leg!'

The old lady was so angry, she took her distaff and stabbed it into the linden tree. At that moment the birds flew away and from the roots to the highest branches the tree began to tremble – from the roots to the branches, the life's blood of the old tree began to drip onto the floor. Soon, the leaves turned brown and fell off.

Frau Hulle shouted:
'Unspeakable one! As with the linden tree, so shall it be for you and the castle too!! You will whither and nevermore know luck!'

With those words, she and Jakob turned and left the castle.

As predicted, so it happened and the castle began to wither away little by little as the linden tree had. Every storm brought the fall of a tower or wall, the rain soaked the roof tiles away and soon the roof trusses became dilapidated. The servants no longer wanted to live in the castle and in the end, only the lord was left living in the cellar where he would sit on his wooden coffer keeping a jealous watch.
At midnight, on the feast of St Martin (11/11) there was a great storm and the withered linden tree finally fell – exactly on the cellar door, blocking the exit. The wicked brother pushed with all his might but the door would not move even the smallest amount. As the the Schellenberg had already been abandoned by all who had lived there, there was noone left to hear his cries for help and so he was left to starve to death on his chest of gold.

Frau Hulle however, knew exactly what had happened and the day after the death of the firstborn son, she went into the courtyard, cleared away the linden tree and opened the gold chest. She divided the brothers' inheritance exactly and put what was rightfully Jakobs into her large purse. At the exact moment when she left the cellar, it collapsed in on itself and she went back to her house.

There, she spoke with Jakob:
'Now, each person has what is his, just as your father decreed. Take what is yours, however being a nobleman no longer has meaning for you. Become a farmer and you will be blessed with yet more luck. Live well and you will never see me again.'

Jakob took his leave and from the money, built a beautiful farm on the Hunsrueck mountain range near Altenbuch. He married a nice lady and fathered many sons and daughters. His barn saw no pestilence and his fruit trees stayed free from caterpillars. Nor did a single hailstorm come over his fields. At harvest time, sometimes Jakob would find that the work had already been done when he came to his fields early in the morning. The sheaves would already be cut, bound and put into piles. His neighbours would then puzzle over who had done such a good thing for him but only Jakob knew that it was Frau Hulle that she was still by his side.

When his first son was born, the happy Jakob decided he should try to find Frau Hulle to tell her of his luck and so he took to the road. He searched the whole day but could find neither the little house where she had lived, nor valley where the little house had been. In the evening, tired he set out for his farm again.

In the end, Jakob died at a very good age. His farm and courtyard still stand to this day and are owned by a farmer by the name of Hunruecks-Philipp.
1852 Die Frau Hulle
in

Sagenbuch der bayerischen Lande


by Alexander Schöppner
1877 Die Frau Hulle
von

Der Sagenschatz des Bayernlandes

, p. 155-160

Auf dem Schellenberge zwischen Haimbuchenthal und Wintersbach stand vor Zeiten ein Schloß, und im Schloßhof ein Lindenbaum. Der war sehr groß und schön und es ging die Sage, so lange der Lindenbaum stehe und grün sei, werde das Schloß auch stehen, wenn er aber dürr und abgängig würde, würde das Schloß verfallen und die Herrenleute würden in's Abwesen gerathen.

  

In dem Schloß nun lebte einmal ein Schloßherr, der hatte zwei Söhne. Der älteste war sehr groß und schön, der jüngste aber war llein und haßlich. In seiner Jugend hatte er einmal das Bein gebrochen, und man nannte ihn darum nur den krummen Jakob. Wie nun der Schloßherr sein Ende nahe fühlte, ließ er sie beide vor sein Bett kommen, übergab dem Einen das Schloß, als dem Erstgeborenen, und eine große Kiste mit Geld und ermahnte ihn, den Jakob bei sich zu behalten, Zeitlebens ihm brüderlich zu begegnen und an nichts es ihm fehlen zu lassen. Das versprach nun der Aelteste mit Hand und Mund, wie aber der Vater gestorben war und er das Schloß überkommen hatte, hielt er's nicht, vielmehr behandelte er den Bruder schlechter, als den geringsten Taglöhner. Er ließ ihn nicht mit sich am Tische essen und nicht in seinem Schlosse wohnen, sondern er mußte im Stall bei dm Pferden schlafen und mit den Hunden aus einer Schüssel essen. Da ging der Jakob, als er sah, daß der Bruder kein brüderliches Herz gegen ihn habe, eines Tages zu ihm und verlangte sein Erbe, denn er wollte sein Glück weiter suchen; der Schloßherr aber gab ihm nichts, sondern schlug ihn und ließ ihn zum Schloß hinauswerfen.

   

'Also geht der krumme Jakob traurig fort in den Wald, immer zu, Berg auf Berg ab, und wie er in's Thal kommt, wo heutzutage die Karthause steht und die alte verfallene Kirche, ist's Abends, und er setzt sich unter einen Baum, legt den Kopf in die Hände und weint bitterlich. Wie er wieder aufstehen will, sitzt gegenüber auf einem Stein eine alte Frau mit grauen Haaren und runzlichtem Gesicht, die spinnt und wie sie das Rad tritt, nickt sie in Einem fort dazu mit dem Kopf, — das war die Frau Hulle. Sie hatte eine kleine Platthaube auf dem Kopfe, wie sie die alten Weiber sonst in die Kirche aufzusetzen pflegten, und eben ein solches schwarzes wollenes Mützchen, das nur bis knapp unter die Ellenbogen ging, und darunter vom Ellenbogen bis an die Hände weiße Stauchen. Sie fragt ihn, warum er so traurig sei? er aber sagt: „Ihr könnt mir doch nicht helfen!" und will weiter. „Du bist der krumme Jakob aus dem Schloß," sagt sie, „ich kenne dich und deinen Bruder und will dir wohl und kann dir helfen, wenn du mir das Zutrauen schenken willst." Da ging dem krummen Jakob das Herz auf — denn seit seines Vaters Tod hatte noch kein Mensch freundlich ihm zugeredet — und er llagte, wie sein Bruder ihn so schlecht behandelt, wie er sein Erbe ihm vorenthalten, und ihn, wie einen Bettler, aus seinem väterlichen Schloß hinausgeworfen. Die Alte aber sagte: „Komm mit mir, nach drei Jahren wollen wir wieder zu deinem Bruder gehen, vielleicht reut's ihn bis dahin, und er gibt dir dein Eigenthum."

   

Der Jakob ließ sich das gerne gefallen, und sie nahm ihn mit sich in ihr Häuschen und gab ihm auf, ihren Rosmannstock zu gießen, und ihre Katze zu füttern, und ihr Flachsfeld zu bauen, und im Winter mußte er Pfahlstecken schneiden für die Weinbergsbauern und Schisssstangen für die Schiffsleute, und im Frühjahr trug er sie an den Main, um sie zu verkaufen. Wenn die rechte Zeit dazu gekommen war, nahm die Frau Hulle ihren Spinnrocken in die Hand, als einen Gehstock, und ihre Kötze (Huckelkorb) auf den Rücken und packte ihr Garn hinein, um es auch zu verkaufen und ging mit, und wenn dem Jakob die Pfahlstecken und Schisssstangen zu schwer wurden wegen seines lahmen Beines, nahm sie ihm die Last ab und warf sie mit ihren dürren Armen oben auf die Kotze, als wenn's Strohbürden wären. Zwischen Haßloch aber und Faulbach ist hart am Weg ein Stein, dort ruhte sie jedesmal aus, und wo ihre Kötze mit den Füßen aufstand, sind die Löcher davon heute noch zu sehen. So hatte es der Jakob recht gut bei ihr; dabei lehrte sie ihn alle Bauernarbeit, so daß er sich zuletzt besser darauf verstand, als ein geborner Bauer.

    

Wie aber die drei Jahre um waren, sagte die Alte: „Komm, nun wollen wir zu deinem Bruder gehen!" und nahm ihren Spinnrocken in die Hand und die Kötze auf de n Rücken, und der Jakob ging mit. Den Bruder fanden sie im Schloßhof unter der Linde sitzen, — denn es war sehr schwül an dem Tag, und die Linde blühte und gab einen großen Schatten, und die Vogel sangen in ihren Zweigen. Wie sie herankommen, fragt er sie nach ihrem Begehr, und die Frau Hulle nimmt das Wort für den krummen Jakob und sagt, sein Bruder sei da und wolle, was ihm gehöre. Der Schloßherr aber flucht und sagt, wenn sie nicht gleich gingen, wolle er ihr ihren alten wackeligen Kopf herunterreißen und dem Krummen das andere Bein auch noch lahm schlagen.

     

Da wurde die Alte sehr zornig, nahm ihren Spinnrocken und stieß ihn in die Linde, und alsbald, wie dieß geschehen, fliegen die Vögel auf, und der Baum fängt an zu zittern von der Wurzel bis zum Gipfel, und aus dem Stamm und den Aesten und Zweigen läuft der Saft und tropft auf den Boden, und die Blätter werden gelb und fallen ab, und die Frau Hulle sagt: „O du arger Bösewicht, sieh' her! wie dein Lindenbaum, so soll es dir gehen und deinem Hause, — so sollst du verdorren und verschmachten und absterben, und kein Glück mehr haben ewiglich!" Dann ging sie mit dem Jakob von dannen.

    

Wie sie gesagt hatte, so geschah's. Als der Lindenbaum verdorrt war, da hielt das Schloß nicht mehr. So oft es stürmte, siel auch ein Thurm, oder eine Mauer ein, und der Regen schwemmte die Steine hinweg, so daß man's nicht mehr aufbauen konnte. Kein Mensch wollte mehr im Schlosse bleiben, und der Schloßherr wohnte im Keller, — dort stand die Geldkiste, und von der wollte er sich nicht trennen, sondern hütete sie Tag und Nacht.

     

Zuletzt, wie nichts mehr vom Schlosse übrig war als der Keller und der verdorrte Lindenbaum, der vor dem Keller stand, kam auf Martini in der Mitternacht ein großer Sturm und warf den Lindenbaum auch um: der siel gerade vor die Kellerthür und sperrte den Ausgang und der Schloßherr konnte die Thüre nicht mehr aufbringen, wie er sich auch anstemmte und nach Hülfe schrie, und mußte elendiglich auf seiner Geldkiste verhungern.

    Die Frau Hulle aber wußte das Alles gar wohl, und den Tag nach seinem Tod kommt sie, hebt den Lindenbaum hinw/g, öffnet die Kiste und scheidet das Geld in zwei gleiche Theile; den einen läßt sie liegen, de n andern nimmt sie mit, und wie sie aus dem Keller tritt, stürzt der auch zusammen. Daheim gibt sie dem Jakob das Geld und sagt: „So! jetzt hat jedweder das Seine — er und du! — wie's der Vater befohlen hat. Nimm, was dein ist, aber den Edelmann schlag dir aus dem Sinn und werd ein Bauer: so kannst du noch Glück haben. Leb wohl, mich wirst du jetzt nicht mehr sehen."

   
Da nahm der Jakob Abschied und baute sich von dem Gelde einen großen Bauernhof auf dem Hundsrück bei Altenbuch, nahm eine Frau und viel Knechte und Mägde und ward ein großer Bauer. Keine Seuche kam in seinen Stall, und keine Raupen auf seine Obstbäume, und kein Hagelschlag über seine Felder. In der Erntezeit, wenn das Gesinde alle Hände voll zu thun hatte, damit das gute Erntewetter nicht verpaßt würde, geschah es oft, daß, wenn sie in der Früh aufs Feld kamen, die Arbeit schon gethan war, daß die Garben alle geschnitten und gebunden und auf Haufen gestellt waren, daß man sie nur hineinzufahren brauchte.

   Die Leute sahen sich groß darum an, — der Jakob aber wußte wohl, wer's gethan hatte. Wie ihm sein erster Sohn geboren wurde, und er's den Nachbarsleuten anzuzeigen ging, meinte er in seiner Freude, er müsse der Frau Hulle doch mich davon Meldung thun, und machte sich zu ihr auf den Weg, aber wie er auch suchte und sich die Augen rieb, er konnte weder das Häuschen mehr sinden, noch das Thal, in dem das Häuschen gestanden, und nachdem er den ganzen Tag vergeblich im Walde herum gelaufen, fand er sich Abends, als man die Lichter anzündete, wieder vor seinem Bauernhof. Endlich ist er im hohen Alter gestorben.

    Sein Hof steht noch und der Bauer, der ihn heutzutag im Bestand hat, heißt der Hundsrücks-Philipp.

Zwischen Heimbuchenthal und Wintersbach liegt der Schellenberg, und auf diesem stand in alter Zeit ein Schloß, und im Schloßhof ein Lindenbaum. Der war sehr groß und schön und es ging die Sage, ss lange der Lindenbaum stehe und grün sei, werde das Schloß auch stehen. Wenn er aber dürr und abgängig würde, würde auch das Schloß verfallen und die Herrenleute würden ins Abwesen gerathen. In dem Schloß auf dem Schellen. berg lebte nun einmal ein Schloßherr, der hatte zwei Söhne. Der älteste war groß und schön, der jüngste aber klein und häßlich. Jn feiner Jugend hatte er bei einem jähen Sturz das Bein gebrochen und man nannte ihn darum nur den krummen Jakob. Als nun der Schloßherr sein Ende nahe fühlte, ließ er sie beide vor sein Bett kommen, übergab dem Einen, als dem Erstgebornen das Schloß und überdies noch eine große Kiste mit Geld und ermahnte ihn, den Jakob bei sich zu behalten, ihm zeitlebens brüderlich zu begegnen und an nichts es ihm fehlen zu lassen. Das versprach nun auch der Aelteste mit Hand und Mund. Als aber der Vater gestorben war, hielt er sein Versprechen nicht, vielmehr behandelte er seinen jüngeren Bruder schlechter, als den geringsten Taglöhner. Er ließ ihn nicht mit sich an einem Tische essen und nicht in seinem Schlosse wohnen, sondern er mußte mit den Hunden aus einer Schüssel essen und bei den Pferden im Stalle schlafen. Als nun der jüngere Bruder diesen Jammer nicht länger ertragen konnte, ging er eines Tages zu seinem älteren Bruder und verlangte sein väterliches Erbe, denn er wolle sein Glück weiter suchen. Der Schloßherr aber gab ihm nichts, schlug ihn und ließ ihn zum Schlosse hinaus werfen.

So verließ nun der arme krumme Jakob die Burg seines Vaters, ging traurig fort in den Wald, immer zu, Berg auf, Berg ab, und wie er ins Thal kam, wo die Karthause stand und die alte verfallene Kirche, war es Abend, und er setzte sich unter einem Baume nieder, legte den Kopf in seine Hände und weinte bitterlich. Als er aber wieder aufstehen will, sitzt ihm gegenüber auf einem Stein ein altes Weib mit grauen Haaren und runzlichem Gesicht, die spinnt, und wie sie das Rad tritt, nickt sie in einem fort dazu mit dem Kopfe; ^ das war die Frau Hulle. Sie hatte eine kleine Platthaube auf dem Kopf, wie sie die alten Weiber sonst in die Kirche aufzusetzen pflegten und eben ein solches schwarzwollenes Mützchen, das nur bis knapp unter die Ellenbogen ging, und darunter vom Ellenbogen bis an die Hände weiße Stauchen. Sie fragte ihn, warum er so traurig sei, er aber antwortete: „Jhr könnt mir ja doch nicht helfen!" und wollte seines Weges weiter gehen. Sie aber ersuchte ihn, zu bleiben, und sagte: „Jch kenne dich und deinen Bruder sehr wohl. Du bist der krumme Jakob vom Schellenberg und wenn du mir Zutrauen schenken willst, so kann und werde ich dir helfen." Da ging dem krummen Jakob das Herz auf, denn seit seines Vaters Tod hatte Niemand mehr sreundlich mit ihm geredet. Er klagte ihr nun, wie ihn sein Bruder mißhandelt, ihm sein Erbe vorenthalten und ihn wie einen Bettler aus dem väterlichen Schlosse hinausgeworfen habe. Die alte aber sagte: „Komm mit mir; nach drei Jahren wollen wir wieder zu deinem Bruder gehen, vielleicht reuts ihn bis dahin und er gibt dir dein Eigenthum."

Der Jakob ließ sich das gerne gefallen und sie nahm ihn mit sich in ihr Häuschen und gab ihm auf, ihren Rosmarinstock zu gießen, ihre Katze zu füttern und ihr Flachsfeld zu bauen, und im Winter mußte er Pfahlsteckm schneiden für die Weinbergsbauern und Schiffsstangen für die Schiffsleute, und im Frühjahr trug er sie an den Main, um sie zu verkaufen.

Wenn die rechte Zeit dazu gekommen war, nahm die Frau Hulle ihren Spinnrocken in die Hand als einen Gehstock und ihren Hockkorb auf den Rücken, packte ihr Garn hinein, um es auch zu verkaufen und ging mit, und wenn dem Jakob die Pfahlstecken und Schiffsstangen zu schwer wurden wegen seines lahmen Beines, nahm sie ihm die Last ab und warf sie mit ihren dürren Armen oben auf die Kötze, so leicht, als wenn es Strohbürden wären. Zwischen Hasloch und Faulenbach aber ist hart am Weg ein Stein, dort ruhte sie jedesmal aus, und wo ihre Kötze mit den Füßen. aufstund, sind die Löcher davon heute noch zu sehen. So hatte es der Jakob recht gut bei ihr; dabei lehrte sie ihn alle Bauernarbeit, so daß er sich zuletzt besser darauf verstand, als ein geborener Bauer.

Als nun die drei Jahre herum waren, sagte die Alte: „Komm, nun wollen wir zu deinem Bruder gehen!" und nahm ihren Spinn, rocken in die Hand und die Kotze auf den Rücken und der Jakob ging mit.

Den Bruder fanden sie im Schloßhof unter der Linde sitzen, denn es war an diesem Tage sehr schwül, und die Linde blühte und gab einen großen kühlen Schatten und die Vögel sangen lieblich in den Zweigen. Wie sie heran kamen, fragte er sie nach ihrem Begehr, die Frau Hulle nimmt aber das Wort für den krummen Jakob und sagte, sein Bruder sei da und wolle, was ihm gehöre. Der Schloßherr aber flucht und sagt, wenn sie nicht gleich von der Stelle gehe, werde er ihr ihren alten wackeligen Kopf herunter reißen und dem Krummen auch noch das andere Bein lahm schlagen. Da wurde die Alte sehr zornig, nahm ihren Spinnrocken, stieß denselben in die Linde, und alsbald, wie dieses geschehen, fliegen die Vögel auf und der Baum fängt an zu zittern von der Wurzel bis zum Gipfel und aus dem Stamm, aus den Aesten und Zweigen läuft der Saft und tropft auf den Boden, die Blätter werden gelb und fallen ab und die Frau Hulle sagt: „O du armer Bösewicht, sieh her! Wie diesem Lindenbaum so soll es dir gehen und deinem Hause; du sollst verdorren und verschmachten und absterben und kein Glück mehr haben, so lange du lebst!" Dann ging sie mit dem Jakob von dannen.

Wie sie prophezeit hatte, so geschah es. Als der Lindenbaum verdorrt war, da hielt auch das Schloß nicht mehr. So oft es stürmte, siel auch ein Stück des Thurmes oder einer Mauer ein und auch die Steine verschwanden, daß man nichts mehr aufbauen konnte. Kein Mensch wollte und konnte mehr im Schlosse bleiben und der Schloßherr wohnte im Keller; dort stand die Geldkiste und von der wollte er sich nicht trennen, sondern hütete sie Tag und Nacht.

Zuletzt, als vom Schlosse nichts mehr übrig war, als der Keller und der verdorrte Lindenbaum, welcher im Hofraum stand, kam auf Martini in der Mitternacht ein großer Sturm nnd warf den Lindenbaum auch um. Der siel gerade vor die Kellerthüre und sperrte den Ausgang. Der Schloßherr konnte die Thüre nicht mehr aufbringen, wie er sich auch dagegen anstemmte und nach Hülfe schrie, und mußte elendiglich auf seiner Geldkiste verhungern.

Die Frau Hulle aber wußte das Alles gar wohl und den Tag nach seinem Tode kam sie, hob den Lindenbaum hinweg, öffnete die Kiste und schied das Geld in zwei gleiche Theile. Den einen ließ sie liegen, den andern nahm sie mit, und wie sie aus dem Keller trat, stürzte auch dieser zusammen. Daheim gab sie dem Jakob das Geld und sagte: „So, jetzt hat jedweder das Seinige, er und du, wie es der Vater vor seinem Tode befohlen hat.

Nimm, was dein ist, aber eines rathe ich dir: schlage dir den Edelmann aus dem Kopfe! Werde ein Bauer, als solcher kannst du noch Glück haben. Jetzt lebe wohl! Mich wirst du nicht mehr sehen."

Da nahm der Jakob Abschied von der Frau Hulle, baute sich von seinem vielen Gelde einen großen Bauernhof auf dem Hundsrück bei Altenbuch, nahm eine Frau, viele Knechte und Mägde und ward ein großer Bauer. Keine Seuche kam in seinen Stall, keine Raupen auf seine Obstbäume und kein Hagelschlag über seine Felder. Jn der Erntezeit, wenn die Dienstboten alle Hände voll zu thun hatten, damit das gute Erntewetter benützt wurde, geschah es öfter, daß, wenn sie früh aufs Feld kamen, daß die Arbeit wie von Heinzelmännchen schon gethan war, daß die Garben alle geschnitten, gebunden und auf Haufen gestellt waren, so daß mctn sie nur nach Hause zu fahren brauchte. Die Leute sahen sich erstaunt einander an, Jakob aber wußte gar wohl, wer es gethan hatte. Als ihm sein erstes Kind geboren wurde, wollte er in der Freude seines Herzens auch der Frau Hulle Nachricht davon geben und machte sich daher zu ihr auf den Weg. Wie er aber auch suchte und sich die Augen rieb, er konnte weder ihr Häuschen sinden, in welchem sie gewohnt hatte, noch das Thal, in welchem es stand, und nachdem er einen ganzen Tag vergebens im Walde herum gelaufen war, fand er sich abends, als man die Lichter anzündele, wieder in seinem Bauernhof. Endlich ist er in hohem Alter gestorben.

Halte deine Hände rein von ungerechtem Gute, denn es bringt Niemand Segen!

A longer version of the German tale can be found as Krumme Jakob in Alphon Steinberger's Bayerischer Sagenkranz, 1897.

Frau Holle Legends of
The High Meißner Mountain

Frau Holle Teich
auf dem Hohen Meißner

The Frau Holle Pond in the High Meissner Mountain
Although used irreverently, Mother Nature is still used in modern advertising campaigns.
Like the German Frau Holle, she is most commonly depicted with black hair dressed in white or green, adorned with flowers.
 The same figure appears as the White Lady in German legend:

"It isn't nice to fool Mother Nature!"

Outsmarting Mother Nature

Some things sound better in French.

.
[
HOME][
BACK]